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Back Pain | Stem Cell, PRP, Acupuncture in Queens & Long Island, New York

  • How to Sleep with Lower Back Pain?

    How to Sleep with Lower Back Pain?

    Lower back pain makes it hard to fall asleep, and it can startle you awake at any hour of the night. To help you reclaim your sleep schedule, here is a simple guide to sleeping with lower back pain: Sleep on your side to relieve pain from a pulled back muscle - One of the most common causes of lower back pain is a pulled back muscle, which occurs when a muscle in your lower back is strained or torn as a result of being over-stretched. Symptoms from a pulled back muscle typically resolve within a few days, but the intense pain can make it difficult to fall asleep at night. Worse yet, the longer you lie in the bed, the more deconditioned your body gets and the worse your symptoms may become.

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  • Chronic Muscle Pain (Myofascial Pain Syndrome)

    Chronic Muscle Pain (Myofascial Pain Syndrome)

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a fancy way to describe muscle pain. It refers to pain and inflammation in the body's soft tissues. MPS is a chronic condition that affects the fascia (the connective tissue that covers the muscles). It may involve either a single muscle or a muscle group. In some cases, the area where a person experiences the pain may not be where the myofascial pain generator is located. Experts believe that the actual site of the injury or the strain prompts the development of a trigger point that, in turn, causes pain in other areas. This situation is known as referred pain.

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  • Could Foot Pain Be Caused by Your Spine?

    Could Foot Pain Be Caused by Your Spine?

    Nerve Pain Caused by A Spinal Problem - If you’re like most people, you might be surprised to learn that the nerve pain in your foot may be caused by a problem in an area as far away as your lumbar spine (lower back). This type of foot pain occurs when an underlying medical problem related to your lumbar spine provokes sciatica symptoms along the large sciatic nerve in your leg. In turn, these painful symptoms may travel all the way down the nerve into your foot.

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  • All You Need to Know About Musculoskeletal Pain

    All You Need to Know About Musculoskeletal Pain

    What Causes Musculoskeletal Pain? - The causes of musculoskeletal pain are varied. Muscle tissue can be damaged with the wear and tear of daily activities. Trauma to an area (jerking movements, auto accidents, falls, fractures, sprains, dislocations, and direct blows to the muscle) also can cause musculoskeletal pain. Other causes of pain include postural strain, repetitive movements, overuse, and prolonged immobilization. Changes in posture or poor body mechanics may bring about spinal alignment problems and muscle shortening, therefore causing other muscles to be misused and become painful.

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  • Signs of a Herniated Disc in the Lumbar and Cervical Spine

    Signs of a Herniated Disc in the Lumbar and Cervical Spine

    Herniated discs can cause a variety of different symptoms, but those symptoms can vary depending on where the disc herniation occurs in your spine. Below, we take a closer look at the symptoms of herniated discs based on where they develop in your back. For those of you unfamiliar with the sections of your spine, it can be broken down into three segments: The cervical, thoracic and lumbar portions of your spine.
    Cervical. The cervical portion of your spine involves the first seven vertebrae at the top of your spine near your neck.
    Thoracic. Below the cervical spine is the thoracic portion of your spine, which is home to the next 12 vertebrae.
    Lumbar. Underneath the thoracic spine sits the lumbar portion of your spine, which involves the next five vertebrae.

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  • 5 Ways to Avoid Undergoing Back Surgery

    5 Ways to Avoid Undergoing Back Surgery

    Nobody wants to go undergo an operation, especially if that surgery involves an intricate structure, like your spine. Although some conditions are best treated with a surgical operation, the vast majority will respond to preventative measures and conservative care. So if you want to avoid an operation on your spine, consider these five tips.
    Avoiding Spine Surgery - Always listen to your physician’s specific advice when it comes to your exact condition, but these five tips can help keep back pain at bay and keep you off the operating table.

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  • What is a Slipped Disc?

    What is a Slipped Disc?

    If you have an issue with one or more of your spinal discs, you’ve likely heard the term “slipped disc.” This term is sometimes used interchangeably with a bulging disc and herniated disc, but there is no consensus in regards to its precise definition. To help clear things up, let’s look at how the term “slipped disc” may be used when it comes to problems with your spinal discs.

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  • Why Are My Joints So Stiff and What Can I Do?

    Why Are My Joints So Stiff and What Can I Do?

    You’re Getting Older - As you age, your cartilage -- the spongy material that protects the ends of your bones -- begins to dry out and stiffen. Your body also makes less synovial fluid, the stuff that acts like oil to keep your joints moving smoothly. The result: Your joints may not move as freely as they used to. It sounds a little crazy, but the best thing you can do is keep on trucking. Synovial fluid requires movement to keep your joints loose.

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  • Heat for Lower Back Pain Relief

    Heat for Lower Back Pain Relief

    With so many advancements in the treatment of lower back pain, heat therapy is often overlooked. But heat therapy can provide meaningful relief in a short amount of time—and best of all it is easy to do. Here is how to use heat therapy to help you find relief from your lower back pain: How Much Heat Do I Need? - Before we talk about how to apply heat therapy to your lower back, let’s quickly look at the best temperature for heat therapy. Ideally, any type of heat therapy should be at a warm temperature—as too high of a heat can burn your skin. In contrast, a warm temperature will allow the heat to penetrate down into your lower back muscles without damaging your skin.

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  • Tips for Sleeping with Chronic Pain

    Tips for Sleeping with Chronic Pain

    If you’re like most people with chronic pain, you struggle with either falling asleep or staying asleep. This is no small matter, as a lack of sleep can make your chronic pain worse—which may lead to a frustrating cycle of sleeplessness and intensifying pain. Here are 5 little-known tips that may help you break this cycle:

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